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What is a Bruised Tooth?

Most of us a familiar with getting a bruised knee or elbow when we fall, but did you know that you can bruise your tooth? Well, you can! If you have localized pain in your gums or a stabbing pain in one area, you could have a bruised tooth. However, if the pain is broad and spreads to different parts of the gums you could have an infection or gum disease. These are more serious conditions that should be taken care of right away. If you think you have an infection of gum disease call Dr. Cox at Cox Family Dental, today!

 

What is a Bruised Tooth?

Just as your knee or elbow will turn black and blue after a fall so will your tooth. This is because the capillaries below the surface burst. After an injury, the tooth may look grey. Sometimes this goes away; however, other times it may be permanently damaged. If you have a grey tooth, visit Dr. Cox and his team at Cox Family Dental to see if it is bruised. If it is, it is important that Dr.Cox monitors your tooth closely to ensure that your condition does not worsen. Although, if your tooth turns pink this is good news. This is a sign that your tooth is healing itself and the color will disappear.

Bruised Tooth

Preventing a Bruised Tooth

Many teeth are bruised during sports games. It is important that you wear a mouthguard while you are playing sport to prevent a bruised tooth or other tooth injuries. Even in incidental sports like volleyball, basketball, baseball, wrestling, and soccer should wear a mouthguard to prevent injuries.

 

Is a Bruised Tooth the Same As An Infected Tooth?

No. A bruised tooth is usually less severe than an infected tooth. After an injury, you may bruise your teeth which can go repair itself overtime. However, in some cases, the tooth may not recover, which keeps your tooth grey. There are number of cosmetic procedures that Dr. Cox at Cox Family Dentistry in Plano, Texas can perform to improve the look of your smile.

 

An infected tooth can damage your oral health as well as its appearance. Some infections begin after a cavity has developed and has worsened. If the tooth infection is not treated right away, you may need a dental implant, bridge, or root canal. Further, the infection can spread into your gums and to your head and neck. This is why any toothache should be treated seriously. If you have a sore tooth, call Dr. Cox at Cox Family Dentistry right away to plan a visit.

 

Believe it or not, you can bruise your tooth! From a sports injury to a fall, you can bruise your tooth in many different ways. However, the important thing to remember is to visit Dr. Cox right away if you have a toothache. A bruised tooth can resolve itself, but sometimes it may not heal and you may need a cosmetic treatment. For more information about oral health or to plan your next visit, call Cox Family Dentistry at (972)-468-8692, today!

 

Difference between a Dental Filling and a Dental Sealant

Often our patients ask us how they can better care for their teeth. Of course, our number one recommendation is to floss once and brush twice a day for two minutes each. However, there are other preventative and restorative ways to maintain a healthy smile. At Cox Family Dentistry, we use dental fillings and dental sealants to protect and preserve your healthy teeth. These cavity-fighting cousins can be difficult to distinguish. Read below to find out the differences.

Dental Sealants are Preventative

Cavities form when the enamel on your tooth is broken down by acids in starches and sugars. To thwart this, Dr. Cox recommends that you use fluoride toothpaste, floss once a day, and drink plenty of water. This combination will keep the enamel clean and strong. However, natural cracks and ridges form in your teeth. It is difficult to reach these spaces with a toothbrush or floss. In this case, Dr. Cox usually recommends a protective measure, typically given to children, called sealants. A sealant fills in these naturally occurring crevices to reduce the possibility of cavity development.

Dental Fillings are Restorative

Although, if a cavity does develop, dental fillings are typically used to occupy the whole in your tooth. Once Dr. Cox removes the decayed part of the tooth, the area can be filled with a composite resin or metal which prevents future damage and strengthens your tooth. Unlike sealants, dental fillings can last decades with proper care while sealants can be removed by chewing gum, eating sticky food, or teeth grinding.

Choosing a between a dental filling and a dental sealant is more dependent on the state of your oral health than on personal preferences. If you have young children, ask Dr. Cox about applying a sealant to their teeth if [he/she] has not already. Additionally, remember that neither treatment options are a substitute for proper oral health habits such as flossing, brushing, and drinking plenty of water.

If you have more questions about dental fillings or sealants, please contact Cox Family Dentistry today. To schedule an appointment for a filling or sealant, go to our website or call 972-468-8692. We look forward to seeing you!

4 Ways TMJD Impacts You

“Oh, I have TMJD, I can’t open my mouth very wide.”

Does this sound familiar? Your “TMJ” (temporomandibular joing) is a joint just like any other in the body…everyone has one, and it can become sore from time to time. When there’s an actual disorder associated with the joint, we usually refer to it as TMJD or TMD (temporomandibular disorder.)

Fortunately, there are a few ways you can limit the ways TMJD impacts you in your everyday life. It all boils down to identifying the causes behind it. Here are a few of the most common:

Crooked Teeth

Misaligned teeth don’t function efficiently. As a result, your jaw has to make atypical movements to bite and chew your food effectively. The strain can add up!

Stress

It’s fairly common for people to clench their teeth when stressed out from work, school, or just life. You could be doing it on your commute home or even during the night. The first sign to watch for is soreness right when you wake up, or headaches when you drive

Sleep Apnea

When your brain is struggling for oxygen due to a sleeping disorder, it can cause muscle tension through your jaws and teeth. Have your dentist check for excessive signs of wear, or consider getting a take-home sleep study.

Excessive Use

Do you find yourself chewing gum all day long, or forcing your way through firmer foods like steak? Back it off a bit. Put the gum away and stick to softer foods for a while to see if things improve.

If you don’t find your symptoms subsiding, be sure to see your dentist. He or she may recommend a splint to wear when you sleep, refer you to an orthodontist, or advise a specific type of medication for short-term relief. An x-ray and exam are one of the best places to start when it comes to seeing what’s going on inside of your TMJ. Schedule one today!